Print Page


Sports

By MELANIE STEELE
Sun Advocate reporter

Mike Smith has not only helped the Dinos from the mound this season, but has also caused some damage from the plate

The regular season is over and Carbon is undisputably on top.

No Region 8 team was able to dethrone the Dinos this season and Carbon enters the first round state playoffs with a flawless, 8-0 region record.

Delta was the last Region 8 foe to fall under the heavy weight of Carbon's solid offense, defense and pitching.

Lefty Mike Smith pitched a one-hitter for the Dinos as they cruised to a 5-0 win over the Rabbits.

According to coach Lane Herrick, the strong wind that had held up hits all day worked in Delta's favor to break up Smith's perfect game.

The only Delta hit was a weak blooper that managed to drop.

Smith ended the day with 13 strikeouts.

The wind was not quite so kind to Carbon's Chris Hatch, though. In the fifth, what should have been a very long three run homer got caught in the wind and nabbed by a Delta outfielder.

The hit was deep enough to score two Dinos.

Now as first seed, Carbon will host the fourth-seeded Tooele Buffaloes for the opening game of the tournament on Saturday, May 8.

The 8-14 Buffaloes ended the regular season with three wins to put themselves into a tie with Morgan.

Tooele then beat Morgan 14-6 in a tie-breaker on Tuesday to advance to the 3A tournament and have a shot at the Dinos.

The Tooele-Carbon game will begin at 10 a.m. at the Carbon High baseball field.

Uintah and Snow Canyon will also play at the same time on the College of Eastern Utah field.

At 2 p.m., losers will pair with losers and winners will face winners.

The Carbon 2 p.m. game will remain at the Carbon High field regardless of the 10 a.m. game outcome.

Teams with one loss or less will advance to the state tournament at Spanish Fork on May 13-15.

According to Herrick, fans can likely expect five teams to be slugging it out for a state title.

Watch for Carbon to be a top contender, along with Bear River, Wasatch, Cedar City and Dixie.

For more information on the 3A tournament or for a copy of the tournament brackets, visit the Utah High School Activities Association website at www.uhsaa.org.


Desert Thunder Raceway track crews assist a driver with a dangling metal scrap after a collision banged-up the late model during the May 1 races. The 2004 season began on April 3 and races take place every two weeks. The next race will be May 15, beginning at 6 p.m.


Aaron Sandoval of Mont Harmon junior high broke the Junior High area record record time for the 100 meter run, a record which has stood since 1987.

Sandoval's 11.19 second time secured him first place at the April 30 track meet and a spot in the track record books.

The old time was 11.50 second.

Sandoval was also part of the first place 4x100 relay team, along with Bradey Wilde, J.J. Blue and Dustin Cook, and took first in the long jump.

Other Mont Harmon and Helper Junior High winners at the four school meet included:

Mont Harmon girls - Megan Garvin, 4th place, high jump, 6th place, shot put; Erika Potts, 2nd place, shot put; Farrah Nelson, 3rd place, shot put; Kaylee Norris, 2nd place, discus; Whitney Williams, 4th place, softball throw; Julia Potts, 2nd place, 1600 meter, 5th place, long jump; Heather Woodruff, 1st place, 200 meter, 3rd place, 100 meter; Britni Greenwood, 4th place, 400 meter, 6th place, 200 meter; Katie Palmer, 5th place, 400 meter; Katie Kilbourne, 4th place, 1600 meter; Team, 3rd place, 4x100 relay; 3rd place, 4x200 relay.

Mont Harmon boys - Bren Pruitt, 4th place, discus; J.J. Blue, 2nd place, 400 meter, 3rd place, long jump, 3rd place, softball throw; Dustin Cook, fifth place, hurdles; Michael Spears, 2nd place, shot put; Kyle Asay, 1st place, softball throw, 2nd place, high jump; Thomas Etzel, 6th place, discus; Bradey Wilde, 3rd place, zoom; Zac Jones, 5th place, softball throw.

Helper girls - Emily Cox, 6th place, hurdles; 2nd place, 800 meter relay; Whitney Oliver, 2nd place, 800 meter relay; Brenda Davis, 2nd place, 400 meter relay; Boshea Howa, 2nd place, 200 meter, 2nd place, 400 meter relay, 4th place, 100 meter; Karlee Martino, 2nd place, 800 meter relay; Rebecca Limone, 6th place, 400 meter; Amber Fralick, 2nd place, 400 meter relay, 4th place, 200 meter; Carrie Adams, 6th place, discus; Traci Steele, 2nd place, 400 meter; Sara Hribar, 2nd place, 800 meter relay. Overall, 4th place.

Helper boys - Branden Wilson, 1st place, 200 meter, 1st place, high jump, 2nd place, softball throw, 3rd place, long jump; Derek Fralick, 3rd place, 800 meter relay; West Hunsaker, 1st place, hurdles, 1st place, shot put, 3rd place, 400 meter relay; Cole Stevens, 3rd place, 800 meter relay; Sam Madrid, 3rd place, 400 meter relay, 4th place, mile; JD Sherman, 3rd place, 400 meter relay, 4th place, 100 meter relay; Chris Noyes, 3rd place, 800 meter relay, 6th place, mile; Anthony Kelly, 3rd place, 800 meter relay; Tyler Gale, 2nd place, long jump. Overall, 2nd place.


While it appears Utah's big game herds made it through the winter in good shape, there's still work to do to bring deer and elk to numbers called for in the state's management plans, according to the Utah Wildlife Board.

To help increase the number of deer and elk in Utah, board members approved reductions in the number of doe deer and cow elk hunting permits available this fall. A total of 2,155 doe deer permits will be available, compared to 3,605 in 2003.

Most of the doe deer permits are for areas where deer damage agricultural crops each year or where rangelands are not able to support large numbers of deer.

Cow elk permits were reduced even more. A total of 6,802 cow elk permits will be available, compared to 10,952 last year.

The board also approved a total of 222 doe pronghorn antelope permits. Most of those permits are two-doe permits that will allow holders to take two doe pronghorn off the Plateau unit in south-central Utah, where the pronghorn herds are over the population objective for the unit.

A total of 23 cow moose permits also will be available.

Applications for 2004 Utah antlerless permits will be available by May 25.

Applications must be received no later than June 21 to be entered in the draw for permits. Draw results will be available by July 29.

In addition to permits, Division of Wildlife Resources biologists are still conducting spring surveys to learn how many animals died this winter.

But, it appears Utah's deer, elk, pronghorn and moose herds made it through the past few months in good shape.

"It doesn't appear there was any major winter loss," said Jim Karpowitz, big game coordinator for the DWR. "The winter was fairly severe from Salt Lake City to Brigham City, but it was pretty mild everywhere else."

Right now, Karpowitz said he is hoping for rain.

"Big game animals will be giving birth to and caring for fawns and calves during the next few months, and good precipitation is important in providing them the forage they need," he said. "What the weather does over the next few months will play a big role in determining how well the herds do this year."

Karpowitz said the total number of deer observed statewide by DWR biologists after last fall's hunting season was down about 5 percent from the number observed after the fall 2002 seasons. He added that drought conditions are the biggest reason.

"The number of fawns that have been born and have survived to adulthood has been dropping since 1998, but a wet spring last year allowed fawn numbers to rebound," he said. "We're hoping to see even more fawns this year."

Drought is also one of the reasons elk populations have declined from an estimated 60,595 elk after the 2002 hunting seasons to an estimated 58,025 after last year's seasons. Elk herds have been intentionally reduced during the last several years to relieve drought-impacted rangelands.

"We've offered quite a few cow elk permits over the past few years, to try and get elk herds to a point where the habitat could sustain them," Karpowitz said. "Fortunately, forage conditions improved last spring, and we're seeing some good green-up again this year. We feel we can start building the elk herds gradually again. This year's cow elk permit reduction is the first step in doing that."

While deer and elk numbers are down slightly, pronghorn on the Plateau unit in south-central Utah are doing well.

According to Karpowitz, the herds are above objective currently.

He stated that increased doe hunting, and transplanting animals from the unit to other pronghorn units, are two ways to reduce the number of animals and bring them back within objective."

The state's moose herds also are doing well, although a few animals have died during the hot summers the past few years, Karpowitz pointed out.

"Moose in Utah are at the extreme south end of their range, and the hot weather can negatively affect them," he said.

For more information, contact the Price Division of Wildlife Resources office.


While it appears Utah's big game herds made it through the winter in good shape, there's still work to do to bring deer and elk to numbers called for in the state's management plans, according to the Utah Wildlife Board.

To help increase the number of deer and elk in Utah, board members approved reductions in the number of doe deer and cow elk hunting permits available this fall. A total of 2,155 doe deer permits will be available, compared to 3,605 in 2003.

Most of the doe deer permits are for areas where deer damage agricultural crops each year or where rangelands are not able to support large numbers of deer.

Cow elk permits were reduced even more. A total of 6,802 cow elk permits will be available, compared to 10,952 last year.

The board also approved a total of 222 doe pronghorn antelope permits. Most of those permits are two-doe permits that will allow holders to take two doe pronghorn off the Plateau unit in south-central Utah, where the pronghorn herds are over the population objective for the unit.

A total of 23 cow moose permits also will be available.

Applications for 2004 Utah antlerless permits will be available by May 25.

Applications must be received no later than June 21 to be entered in the draw for permits. Draw results will be available by July 29.

In addition to permits, Division of Wildlife Resources biologists are still conducting spring surveys to learn how many animals died this winter.

But, it appears Utah's deer, elk, pronghorn and moose herds made it through the past few months in good shape.

"It doesn't appear there was any major winter loss," said Jim Karpowitz, big game coordinator for the DWR. "The winter was fairly severe from Salt Lake City to Brigham City, but it was pretty mild everywhere else."

Right now, Karpowitz said he is hoping for rain.

"Big game animals will be giving birth to and caring for fawns and calves during the next few months, and good precipitation is important in providing them the forage they need," he said. "What the weather does over the next few months will play a big role in determining how well the herds do this year."

Karpowitz said the total number of deer observed statewide by DWR biologists after last fall's hunting season was down about 5 percent from the number observed after the fall 2002 seasons. He added that drought conditions are the biggest reason.

"The number of fawns that have been born and have survived to adulthood has been dropping since 1998, but a wet spring last year allowed fawn numbers to rebound," he said. "We're hoping to see even more fawns this year."

Drought is also one of the reasons elk populations have declined from an estimated 60,595 elk after the 2002 hunting seasons to an estimated 58,025 after last year's seasons. Elk herds have been intentionally reduced during the last several years to relieve drought-impacted rangelands.

"We've offered quite a few cow elk permits over the past few years, to try and get elk herds to a point where the habitat could sustain them," Karpowitz said. "Fortunately, forage conditions improved last spring, and we're seeing some good green-up again this year. We feel we can start building the elk herds gradually again. This year's cow elk permit reduction is the first step in doing that."

While deer and elk numbers are down slightly, pronghorn on the Plateau unit in south-central Utah are doing well.

According to Karpowitz, the herds are above objective currently.

He stated that increased doe hunting, and transplanting animals from the unit to other pronghorn units, are two ways to reduce the number of animals and bring them back within objective."

The state's moose herds also are doing well, although a few animals have died during the hot summers the past few years, Karpowitz pointed out.

"Moose in Utah are at the extreme south end of their range, and the hot weather can negatively affect them," he said.

For more information, contact the Price Division of Wildlife Resources office.


The stage is set for the Utah State High School 2-A baseball tournament schedules this week in Helper and Price.

Eight prep teams will be in Carbon County Thursday, Friday and Saturday seeking the baseball championship in the double elimination meet.

Beginning on Thursday, games at the College of Eastern Utah field and Gardner Field in Helper will start at 11 a.m.

The two games schedules for the CEU field will be elimination games, as all four teams received losses in first round games last Saturday.

The first game matches Gunnison with Grand at 11 a.m. and will be followed by a 1:30 p.m. matchup between Richfield and North Sevier.

The winners of the two games will move on to Helper for late afternoon and evening games against the losers of earlier games played in Helper.

The first championship bracket game in Helper pits Parowan against Beaver at 11 p.m. and the second will be Juan Diego and Enterprise at 1:30 p.m.

The winners of these games will get the rest of the day off, awaiting action on Friday.

The loser face elimination against the winners coming out of the CEU action in 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. games.

Tournament action continues on Friday in Helper with three games, the first at 11 a.m.

The 2A state title game will take place at 11 a.m. on Saturday.

The possibility exists that two games will be required on Saturday should the team coming out of the loser's bracket upset the undefeated team.


The annual Division of Wildlife Resources' kids' fishing event will take place May 15 at the Huntington Game Farm Pond north of Huntington.

The gate opens at 8 a.m. Kids under 14 do not need a license. The limit is four fish in the aggregate (bass, bluegill, and trout). There will be a lot of prizes furnished by area retailers and fishing tackle manufacturers.

The DWR will have rods, reels and bait for public use and the event is free. Dedicated hunters and volunteers will be on-hand to help the kids.

For more information, contact Brent Stettler at 636-0266.

Fishing in southeastern Utah has been mixed as the summer months approach. Mountain reservoirs are quickly thawing with unseasonably warm temperatures.

Fish hatcheries are getting ready for their annual pre-Memorial Day stocking of lakes, reservoirs and streams.

•Benches and Boulger Reservoirs - The reservoirs are thawing, but have not been stocked.

•Cleveland Reservoir - The north end was open last weekend. Todd Munford of Big Pine Sports in Fairview reported that fishing with a straight nightcrawler and split shot was the ticket.

He recommends that fly fishermen use sinking line and slow-strip yellow or chartreuse wooly bugger patterns. Not many fish carried over from last year. Munford noted some 14-16 inch rainbows.

•Electric Lake - The Lake is open. Mud and snow Access continue to be a problem.

Biologist Justin Hart reported good fishing with dead minnows below the dam. Fishing has been good near the inlet with Panther Martin lures or chrome Jake's Spin-a-Lures.

The tributaries are closed to fishing until July 10th to protect spawning cutthroat trout.

•Fairview Lakes - The lakes are breaking up but probably won't be accessible for the next few weeks.

•Gooseberry Reservoir - The U.S. Forest Service gate will remain closed until the road dries out.

•Huntington Creek - Try small dry flies, such as an Adam's with a light leader.

•Huntington Reservoir - The ice is starting to come off. Munford reported seeing signs of thawing near the inlets and on the east shoreline. Shoreline angling is expected by this weekend.

Munford recommends using a straight nightcrawler with occasional movement to entice a strike. Tiger trout are healthy and in the 12-17 inch size class. Excellent fishing is expected over the next few weeks.

Fly fishermen should do well with sinking line and brown leech patterns or rust-colored wooly buggers.

•Joes Valley Reservoir - The trout limit is two; only one over 22 inches; all trout from 15-22 inches must be immediately released.

•Lasal Mountains - All mountain lakes remain snowed in, except for Hidden and Dons lakes, which have not been stocked.

Carry-over fish may still be caught, however.

•Potters Ponds - The ponds remain inaccessible.

•San Juan County - Good fishing continues at Blanding 3 and Blanding 4 reservoirs with traditional baits such as marshmallows, PowerBait or salmon eggs. Pike fishing at Recapture Reservoir has been fair to good for northern pike.

Anglers should try spinners from shore or use Rapalas while trolling. Lloyd's Lake has been fair from shore for rainbow trout using traditional baits. The inlet has been the best spot to fish.

Foy Reservoir is good with baits and spinners for brook and rainbow trout. Fishing at Ken's Lake has been fair to good for 10-12 inch rainbows and an occasional brown trout or largemouth bass.

Traditional baits have been working for tout. Mumford recommends jigs or crankbaits for bass.

•Scofield Reservoir - Conservation Officer Stacey Jones reports that fishing success has been best in the early morning.

During daylight hours, fishing has been rather slow-in large part, due to a midge hatch.

Boat anglers have either been trolling along the shoreline or still fishing with worms or PowerBait.

Jones said fish are moving into deeper water. Anglers are reminded that tributaries are closed to fishing until July 10th.


A reward of up to $1,000 is being offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for killing nine deer in the Dolores Triangle area, near Glade Park. The deer were poached between February 25 and March 3.

The deer carcasses were discovered along the Coates Creek Road, approximately five miles inside the Utah border. All nine deer, consisting of eight does and fawns and one buck, were shot and left to waste.

Only the head and antlers were removed from the buck. All of the deer were apparently shot from the road.

"This is the most shocking case of senseless slaughter I've seen," stated Vance Mumford, Moab district DWR conservation officer.

Anyone with any information about this incident should contact Mumford at 435-820-6015.

To report any other wildlife violation in Utah, call the Help Stop Poaching Hotline at 1-800-662-DEER.

Information will be taken in strict confidentiality. Callers may remain anonymous, but are encouraged to provide enough detail about incidents to substantiate their claims.





Print Page