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Dino wrestlers qualify 8 for State Tournament

Dallyn Mower qualified in the 195 lbs weight class.
Bradlee Chatterton will compete at 126 lbs for Carbon High.
Jacky Byrge will compete in the 132 lbs weight class at the 3A State Tournament for Carbon High.
Taylon Abeyta, right, qualified for the 3A State Tournament at 160 lbs.

By KEVIN SCANNELL
Sun Advocate sports reporter

Program rebuild continues as CHS prepares to send group to 3A State Tourney

After months and months of grueling work on the mats, fighting to keep their weights at competing levels and wrestling against tough competition from around the state, a group of Carbon High wrestlers saw the work pay off.

Steve Woodhouse, Carbon High head wrestling coach, said the Dino wrestling team had a good showing at the region meet held in Richfield on Friday and Saturday.

When the competition ended the Dinos were able to qualify eight wrestlers for the 3A State Tournament on Feb. 14-15 at the Maverik Center in Salt Lake City.

Those wrestlers who qualified for the state tournament include:

McCoy Brinkerhoff, 120;

Bradlee Chatterton, 126;

Jacky Byrge, 132;

Taylon Abeyta, 160;

Alexander Kreher, 160;

Nash Nicholson, 182;

Dallyn Mower, 195;

Dakota Nichols, 285.

"We did well as a team at the region meet," said Woodhouse. "Our goal at the start of the season was to get at least six to eight wrestlers qualified."

While Woodhouse was happy for those who will be heading off to the state tournament, he also said the Dinos missed out on adding a few more wrestlers to the list of heading to state.

Woodhouse said the 145 lbs weight class brought back several wrestlers with state experience. CHS wrestler Jesse Collins, a senior captain, competed in the class but was unable to make it out of what Woodhouse described as a "stacked weight class" of wrestlers.

"We competed in a tough region meet with many strong wrestlers from southern Utah," he said.

With just a few practices left before the state tournament, Woodhouse said the eight wrestlers would work on fine tuning things and not trying to do too much.

"They just need to work hard over the last few practices," said Woodhouse.




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