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Decked out for Lincoln Exhibit at Western Mining and Railroad Museum

The Western Mining and Railroad Museum in Helper recently hosted the "Abraham Lincoln self made in America" exhibit. Les and Randee Schultz, both in era clothing, proudly show off their personal collection of reproductions of the Civil War era. In this exhibit, Les' display included horse and soldier gear, a Colt Navy army pistol, and a wrist breaker saber. Randee proudly displayed items and clothing that she personally sewed with reproduction fabrics from the era as well, including a parasol, a chemise, and a corset. Les and Randee were on hand to explain the significance and importance of their collection to the public as they visited the museum. In Les's collection the wrist breaker saber received its name from the saber being so long and heavy, that if the soldier was to hit anything that was really hard, it would usually break the wrist of the soldier. When asked about her collection Randee stated," Women of this era had only one or two outfits, but had many chemises. They could easily wash them so in turn this helped to keep the outside garment clean." Randee's artful ability to sew these costumes, their wonderful collection, and their knowledge and love of the history, is what makes this Price couple unique. Living and breathing their love for this, they are readily recognized in the community. This exhibit ran through July 16.

The Western Mining and Railroad Museum in Helper recently hosted the "Abraham Lincoln self made in America" exhibit. Les and Randee Schultz, both in era clothing, proudly show off their personal collection of reproductions of the Civil War era. In this exhibit, Les' display included horse and soldier gear, a Colt Navy army pistol, and a wrist breaker saber. Randee proudly displayed items and clothing that she personally sewed with reproduction fabrics from the era as well, including a parasol, a chemise, and a corset. Les and Randee were on hand to explain the significance and importance of their collection to the public as they visited the museum. In Les's collection the wrist breaker saber received its name from the saber being so long and heavy, that if the soldier was to hit anything that was really hard, it would usually break the wrist of the soldier. When asked about her collection Randee stated," Women of this era had only one or two outfits, but had many chemises. They could easily wash them so in turn this helped to keep the outside garment clean." Randee's artful ability to sew these costumes, their wonderful collection, and their knowledge and love of the history, is what makes this Price couple unique. Living and breathing their love for this, they are readily recognized in the community. This exhibit ran through July 16.




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