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Patriot acts

Castle Heights Elementary School fifth-grader, Addy Olsen, center, is congratualted by Mayor Joe Piccolo and his wife, Barbara, after completing a history project. Four other students were honored, as well, receiving a special city pin and a commemorative Prive 100th anniversary medal.

By GREG EICHELBERGER
Sun Advocate reporter

Calling them "future Sterling Scholars and future leaders of the country," Price Mayor Joe Piccolo, along with his wife, Barbara, honored five students at Castle Heights Elementary School on Tuesday, March 16.

The pupils, in Diana Woods' class, were given a history project requiring them to memorize the Pledge of Allegiance, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Star-Spangled Banner (all four verses), all of the U.S. Presidents in order and the Gettysburg Address, among other assignments.

Most of the children finished most of the work, but only five, Nathanial Metzger, Sarah Ohlwiler, Kody Wells, Noah Morley and Addy Olsen completed the entire project.

"That's a miraculous amount to learn for anybody, not just young people," said Piccolo, who gave an inspiring talk to Woods' class before awarding the quintet a city pin as well as a special 100th anniversary Price City commemorative medal.

"I'm proud of you and Price City is proud of you," he added. "You deserve to be acknowledged. I'm jealous. I don't even know the whole Gettysburg Address."

According to Woods, the project was brought about as part of the class' history cirriculum to make the students aware of this country's past. "To show them how important freedon is," she said.

"It's amazing what these children have accomplished," Woods added. "I am so very proud of them and impressed by their hard work."

And the work was a bit difficult. "It was really hard, at times," said Addy, 11. "It was challenging and there were times I was really frustrated with the whole thing. But once I accomplished another part of the assignment, I felt really good about myself."

Sarah added, "I liked memorizing the Gettysburg address. It only took me one night. After I did it, I felt very good and very relieved. I was happy that it was done and I could move on to another part of the project."

Noah concurred, saying that he, too, appreciated the Gettysburg Address. "I just like memorizing things. It made me feel good to accomplish this."

For Kody, it was about proving to himself he could do the work - that a a little bit of an incentive. "I was motivated a little bit by the 'Patriot's Award,'" he admitted. "The basket of goodies was great, but I also wanted to feel I did something important. Something I could be proud of."

Kody added that he enjoyed studying the Presidents most of all.

"What is patriotism?" asked Piccolo. "Is it the Statue of Liberty, the military, the Constitution? I can sum it up in one sentence: America stands for freedom. From the Star-Spangled Banner to the U.S. Constitution to the Gettyburg Address.

"Whenever you see the flag, you should know what it stands for," he added. "Everything you studied in this class is about freedom. I love America and I know you kids do, too."

And even though only five completed the initial assignments to complete the project, Woods indicated that everyone in class will have the opportunity to complete the work and receive a good grade based up their efforts.

"Almost all of the students attempted to do as much as they could," she said. "We want to make sure everyone is recognized for their efforts."




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