Print Page


Venus, moon appear to collide in sky Wednesday morning

On Wednesday at about 6:30 a.m., the two brightest objects in the night sky - the moon and Venus - came into an unusual tandem.

On Wednesday at about 6:30 a.m., the two brightest objects in the night sky - the moon and Venus - came into an unusual tandem.

For early risers in eastern Utah, the sight was spectacular, with virtually cloudless skies and no haze.

While no one saw it, a bright meteor streaking by could have also been part of the show while aiming telescopes at the Double Star Cluster in Perseus to see the glow of a green comet (Ui-SWAN) nearby.

It was a triple treat for observers.

The Lyrid meteor shower peaks every year on April 22 as the Earth sweeps through the dusty wake of Comet Thatcher.

But on Wednesday morning, the meteors weren't as active as expected.

While the other two events were there, the big show Wednesday morning was the rare close conjunction and occultation of Venus by a very thin waxing crescent moon.

The pair broke the eastern horizon a little before 5 a.m. and it resembled a celestial diamond ring with Venus just off of the moon's bright cusp.

As the sky brightened with the rising sun, the moon actually eclipsed Venus. The planet finally emerged as the sun was coming up, but by that time the moon and the planet itself was relatively obscured by the daylight.




Print Page