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Price city prepares for St. Patrick's Day

Kraync sits at his desk where he works for two of his own businesses along with BEAR, BACA and several other community organizations.
KK stands out in front of the Kraync Motor Company which has been a part of his life in one capacity or another since he was a young teen.

By C.J. MCMANUS
Sun Advocate community editor

Price's downtown will come alive with the Irish spirit on March 14 as the city conducts its annual St. Patrick's Day celebration starting at 9 a.m.

The festivities will begin with a green eggs and ham breakfast at 9 a.m. and continue through noon and the beginning of the St. Patrick's Day Parade.

In addition this year, several downtown merchants will be participating in the "Pot of Gold Scavenger Hunt," which started on March 9 and will continue until the day before the parade.

According to the History Channel's website, St. Patrick is the patron Saint of Ireland and is one of Christians most widely known figures. However, for all his notoriety, the site explains that his life remains largely a mystery.

Many of the stories traditionally associated with the saint, including the famous account of his banishing all the snakes from Ireland, are false and are nothing more than the product of hundreds of years of exaggerated storytelling, according to the site.

It is however known, that St. Patrick was born in Britain to wealthy parents near the end of the fourth century. He was believed to have died on March 17 around 460 A.D., states the site at www.history.com.

At the age of sixteen, Patrick was taken prisoner by a group of Irish raiders who were attacking his family's estate. They transported him to Ireland where he spent six years in captivity. During this time it is reported that he worked as a shepherd, outdoors and away from people.

"Lonely and afraid, he turned to his religion for solace, becoming a devout Christian," reports the website. "It is also believed that Patrick first began to dream of converting the Irish people to Christianity during his captivity."

After Patrick escaped from his captors, writings suggests that the voice of God spoke to him in a dream and told him to leave Ireland. After returning to Britain, Patrick received a second celestial message that told him to return to Ireland as a missionary. He then began his study, which lasted for more than 15 years and contradicts the notion that Patrick brought Christianity to Ireland.

On a more local note, this year's St. Patrick's Day Parade Grand Marshal will be Karl Fletcher Kraync.

Kraync, was born to Alma Fletcher and Frank Kraync in 1945 at the Standardville Hospital in Spring Canyon.

KK, as he is known to his friends around the county, was an entrepreneur even at a young age. He started selling cars at the family owned Kraync Motor Company while still a teen.

"I delivered two Chrysler Rambler Classic wagons to a pair of my school teachers at the end of my freshman year of high school," recalls KK fondly.

While the family store would remain a part of Kraync's life forever, his professional calling led him to other areas. After attending the local high school and college, KK moved up-state and received a masters of science degree in rehabilitation counseling from the University of Utah in 1969.

After graduation, KK returned to Carbon County and went to work immediately, serving as a counselor for five years at the division of rehabilitation services.

In 1974 he was made the youngest district director in the agency's history, giving him the responsibility for vocational re-training and assistance in the entire eastern Utah district a position he held for 32 years.

While working for the rehabilitation office, Kraync remained very involved with the family business, which he took over following the death of his father. KK has passed up numerous advancements and financial gain to remain in Carbon County, in his own words, "selling cars for this business is just who I am."

Despite his dedication to sales, KK has performed an extraordinary amount of community service over the course of his life, all of it for the people of Castle Valley.

Kraync always has worked tirelessly for economic development in the area and has been recognized for it on numerous occasions by his peers.

He set up multiple programs while at the state office and continues to now that he is retired. While KK is the director the Business Expansion and Retention Project, he counts his recognition as the Financial Services Advocate of the Year for the Small Business Administration of Utah as one of the shining points of his life.

"That award came as part of the Southeastern Utah Small Business Investment Fund which I headed from the beginning and am incredibly proud of," said Kraync.

KK also is very active in the local Bikers Against Child Abuse Chapter, he hosts their annual Christmas meet and greet with Santa and is the units treasurer.

After retiring from rehab, Kraync set up a private counseling practice and continues to try and sell a car to anyone who throws a passing glance his way. He is a lifelong Carbon County resident and has three children with his wife, Linda of 41 years; Andrea, Brandy and Karl Junior.

"It's nice to be retired," concluded Kraync. "I only work 12 hour shifts now."




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