Classifieds Business Directory Jobs Real Estate Autos Legal Notices ePubs Subscribe Archives
Today is September 19, 2014
home news sportsfeature opinion fyi society obits multimedia

Front Page » August 6, 2013 » Carbon Sports » DWR offers advice for a safe archery hunt
Published 409 days ago

DWR offers advice for a safe archery hunt


Print PageEmail PageShareGet Reprints

If you're an archery hunter, you can stay safe during this year's archery hunts by following a few, simple rules.

Utah's general archery buck deer and elk hunts kick off Aug. 17.

"Every year, we receive reports of archery hunters injuring themselves," says Gary Cook, Wildlife Recreation Program coordinator for the Division of Wildlife Resources.

Two practices lead to most of the accidents: not being safe in tree stands or having arrows out of your quiver when you shouldn't.

Cook provides the following advice to help you avoid these accidents:

If you're going to hunt from a tree stand, make sure it's large enough to hold your weight before you start climbing the tree.

To lessen the chance that you'll fall while climbing the tree, leave your bow, arrows and other equipment on the ground, and attach a haul line to them. Also, be sure to use an approved safety harness (also called a fall arrest system), and always secure yourself to the tree as soon as you leave the ground.

"Once you reach your stand and have attached your safety harness to your final location," Cook says, "then use your haul line to lift your gear to you."

Cook also recommends using a portable tree stand, rather than building a "permanent" one. "Permanent tree stands can deteriorate and become unsafe," he says. "Also, they clutter the landscape. And you can damage or kill the tree by hammering nails into it."

If you're hunting on a national forest or on land managed by the Bureau of Land Management in Utah, you'll have to use a portable tree stand-permanent tree stands are illegal.

Until you're ready to shoot, keep your arrows in a quiver that has a hood on it that covers the broadheads. "One of the most common accidents we see is archers jabbing themselves or other hunters while carrying arrows in their hand or nocked on their bow," Cook says. "Keep your arrows in a quiver until you're ready to shoot."

State law requires that arrows be kept in a case while the arrows are in or on a vehicle. When you're outside your vehicle, it's up to you to protect yourself.

Never take a shot at a deer or an elk that is beyond the maximum, effective range you're comfortable shooting at. Also, before releasing your arrow, make sure of your target and what's beyond it.

After the shot, watch the animal and determine the direction it took. Then, go to the spot where you last saw the animal and find your arrow. If there's blood on it, and if you have a compass, take a bearing on the direction the animal went. Then wait 30 minutes before tracking it. If you track the animal too soon, you can spook it into running. If you wait at least 30 minutes before tracking it, most of the deer and elk you shoot will be found dead within a reasonable distance of your starting point.

When you track an animal, look for blood not only on the ground but on the brush too. If you begin to lose the animal's trail, tie a piece of biodegradable paper near the last blood spot. Then, search for the animal's trail by walking a circular pattern out from the paper. The paper will serve as a marker that will let you know where you started.

Also, tying paper at the locations of the last three or four spots you see, and then standing away from the paper and looking at the paper trail, can help you visualize the direction the animal took.Once you've found the animal, check to see if its eyes are open. If they're not, the animal probably isn't dead. If its eyes are open, touch one of the eyes with a long stick. Doing so will keep you out of harm's way if the animal is still alive. Once the animal is dead, field dress and cool its meat immediately. It's usually warm during the archery hunt. Before you start hunting, make sure you're well beyond the minimum distances you must maintain from roads and dwellings. If you're going to hunt in Salt Lake County, please remember that the county's hunting restrictions are more restrictive than the rest of Utah. Read the 2013 Utah Big Game Field Regulations Guidebook. The free guidebook is available at www.wildlife.utah.gov/guidebooks.

Print PageEmail PageShareGet Reprints


Top of Page


 
Article Photos  
Browse / enlarge – (1 total)
Print photo(s) with article
Get photo reprints on CD
NOTE: To print only the article and included photos, use the print photo(s) with article link above.
Carbon Sports  
August 6, 2013
Recent Sports
Quick Links
Subscribe via RSS
Related Articles  
Related Stories



Best viewed with Firefox
Get Firefox

© Sun Advocate, 2000-2013. All rights reserved. All material found on this website, unless otherwise specified, is copyright and may not be reproduced without the explicit written permission from the publisher of the Sun Advocate.
Legal Notices & Terms of Use    Privacy Policy    Advertising Info    FAQ    Contact Us
  RSS Feeds    News on Your Site    Staff Information    Submitting Content    About Us