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Front Page » June 9, 2011 » Bridal Focus » Common signs you might be a bridezilla
Published 1,234 days ago

Common signs you might be a bridezilla


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Few brides-to-be want to be tagged as a "bridezilla." However, engaging in certain behaviors just might earn them that dubious distinction.

It is believed the term "bridezilla" was coined in a Boston Globe article in June 1995. Since then, it has been widely used for an overbearing bride who is difficult and often a perfectionist.

A woman who is obsessed about every detail of the wedding might turn into a bridezilla. There are several traits that many bridezilla's have in common. If a bride-to-be sees her own behaviors on this list, she may want to make some changes quickly or risk alienating friends and family members.

* Talking about the wedding nonstop. Getting married is exciting and stressful at the same time. It is good for brides to have enthusiasm about the big day, but speaking incessantly over every little detail, especially when the conversation often veers to complaints about vendors and other arrangements, can be off-putting to people. Remember, the world is still turning outside of a bride's wedding realm.

* Extreme dieting. It's understandable when a bride wants to look her best on her wedding day, and this can create a desire to shed a few pounds. However, if dieting becomes extreme, including dramatic calorie control, binging or purging, it can be unhealthy and dangerous. Putting appearances before well-being may constitute bridezilla behavior.

* Failing to spend time with a fiance. When wedding planning and meetings take precedence over spending time with your fiance, it can set a poor course for the future marriage and strain the current relationship.

* A "me-first" attitude. It's unproductive for a bride-to-be to think that her family, bridemaids and others involved in the wedding will drop everything for the sake of the event. Although it is expected that a bridal party will partake in some tasks and responsibilities, they are not the property or employees of the bride. Also, diva behavior and meltdowns -- where all the attention is directed toward the bride-to-be -- is not beneficial as well.

* Going well over budget. At its core, a wedding is the union between two people who pledge to spend the rest of their lives together. While many people want to have the perfect wedding, fixating on every detail and spending excessively to achieve what is perceived as perfection is bridezilla behavior. Entering a marriage already in debt can put a strain on newlywed bliss.

* Fighting with friends and family. Oftentimes brides- and grooms-to-be mask apprehension about starting a new chapter in their lives by getting into disagreements with others. Brides may bicker with their moms over seating arrangements and hairstyles, but they might just be glossing over their evolving mother-child relationship. Fighting just to fight and draw attention to oneself is bridezilla behavior.

* Expecting preferential treatment. Many bridezillas are rude to wedding vendors and think that they deserve something extra. Individuals should remember that florists, dress shops, musicians, and photographers work very hard in their lines of work and often with couples who are emotional and feeling the stress of spending large amounts of money. Adding even more animosity to the situation could result in less-than-stellar results on the big day.

There are things every bride should do in preparation for her wedding. Then there are things that should be avoided for fear of transforming into a bridezilla.

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