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Front Page » August 13, 2002 » Local News » U.S. Census Department Compiles Profiles for Utah
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U.S. Census Department Compiles Profiles for Utah


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The United States Census Bureau recently released the 2000 profiles of Utah's social and economic characteristics.

The demographic profiles are a product of the U.S. Census 2000 long-form questionnaire that contained 53 questions. According to the governor's office, 117,000 Utah households completed the long form.

Compiling the information, the federal agency developed the following profiles:

•The population of Utah increased 29.6 percent during the decade, jumping from 1,722,850 in 1990 to 2,233,169 in 2000.

Utah was the fourth fastest growing state in the nation, growing twice as fast as the U.S. from 1990 to 2000.

Utah ranked first among states in the U.S. in many categories inthe 2000 Census:

Utah had the youngest population in the nation with a median age of 27.1.

The national median age registered at 35.3.

Utah ranked first in the nation at 32.2 percent in the population younger than age 18 in 2000.

• Utah had the largest households in the nation with an average household size of 3.13, compared with 2.59 for the U.S.

Utah had the largest families in the nation with an average of 3.57 members, while the U.S. average family size was 3.14.

•School enrollment in Utah increased 21.4 percent during the decade, climbing from 610,696 in 1990 to 741,524 in 2000.

In 2000, elementary students attending grades one to eight accounted for the majority or 41.2 percent of the population enrolled in school.

College or graduate school students followed at 25.2 percent, high school students at 22.2 percent, preschool at 6.2 percent and kindergarten at 5.2 percent.

College or graduate school enrollment expanded 27 percent statewide from 1990 to 2000, the largest increase among the five categories.

•In 2000, educational attainment in Utah continued to exceed that of the U.S.

The percent of persons age 25 and older in Utah with a high school diploma or higher increased from 85.1 percent in 1990 to 87.7 percent in 2000, compared with 75.2 percent in 1990 to 80.4 percent in 2000 for the U.S.

The percent of persons 25 years of age and older in Utah with a bachelor's degree or higher increased from 22.3 percent in 1990 to 26.1percent in 2000. Nationally, there was an increase from 20.3 percent in 1990 to 24.4percent in 2000

Morgan ranked first among counties in the state in 2000 with 92.6 percent of the population 25 years and older with a high school diploma or more.

Summit followed at 92.5 percent, Davis at 92.2 percent, Rich at 91.5 percent and Utah County at 90.9 percent. San Juan County ranked last with 69.6 percent of the 25 years and older population having a high school diploma or higher.

Summit ranked first among counties in 2000 with 45.5 percent of the population 25 years and older with bachelor degrees or higher, followed by Cache at 31.9 percent, Utah at 31.5 percent, Davis at 28.8 percent and Salt Lake at 27.4 percent.Emery County ranked last with 11.6 percent of the 25 years and older population having a bachelor's degree or higher.

According to Census 2000, Utah's median household income, after being adjusted for inflation, expanded 19 percent during the decade, climbing from $38,448 in 1989 to $45,726 in 1999. In the U.S., median household income increased 7 percent from $39,213 in 1989 to $41,994 in 1999.

Summit posted the highest 1999 median household income among Utah's counties at $64,962. Davis County ranked second in median household income at $53,726, followed by Morgan at $50,273, Wasatch at $49,612 and Salt Lake at $48,373. San Juan reported the lowest median 1999 household income among Utah's counties at $28,137.

The state's median family income increased 18 percent during the decade, climbing from $43,374 in 1989 to $51,022 in 1999. In the U.S., median family income inched up 9 percent from $45,956 in 1989 to $50,046 in 1999.

Summit posted the highest median family income among Utah's counties in 1999 at $72,510. Davis ranked second with a median family income of $58,329, followed by Salt Lake at $54,470, Morgan at $53,365 and Wasatch at $52,102. San Juan County had the lowest median family income at $31,673.

Utah's per capita income jumped 65 percent during the decade, expanding from $11,029 in 1989 to $18,185 in 1999.

In the U.S., per capita income increased 50 percent from $14,420 in 1989 to $21,587 in 1999.

Summit reported the highest per capita income among Utah's counties in 1999 at $33,767. Salt Lake followed at $20,190, Wasatch at $19,869, Davis at $19,506 and Weber at $18,246. San Juan had the lowest per capita income among Utah's counties at $10,229.

According to Census 2000, 9.4 percent of all persons in Utah were living below the poverty level, compared to 11.4 percent in 1989. In the U.S. in 1999, 12.4 percent of all persons were living in poverty, compared to 13.1 percent in 1989.

Among Utah's counties, San Juan reported the highest poverty rate in 1999 at 31.4 percent. Iron followed at 19.2 percent, Duchesne at 16.8 percent, Piute at 16.2 percent and Sanpete at 15.9 percent. Davis County had the lowest poverty at 5.1 percent.

In 1999, 6.5 percent of all families in Utah were living below the poverty level, compared to 8.6 percent in 1989. In the U.S., 9.2 percent of all American families were living in poverty in 1999, down from 10 percent in 1989.

In 1999, 22.1 percent of all Utah families with a female householder and no husband present were below the poverty level, compared to 30.3 percent in 1989. In the U.S., 26.5 percent of all families with a female householder, no husband present, were below the poverty level, compared to 31.1 percent in 1989.

Among Utah's counties, San Juan had the highest percentage of families living below the poverty level at 26.9 percent, followed by Duchesne at 14.2 percent, Iron at 13.1 percent and Wayne at 12.7. Summit County had the lowest percentage of families in poverty at 3 percent.


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