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Front Page » July 31, 2007 » Sports » Southeastern Utah early August fishing report
Published 2,580 days ago

Southeastern Utah early August fishing report


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Shin Ku Kang and his son David at Benches Reservoir last week.

Fire restrictions continue statewide. No open fires are allowed, except in metal or concrete rings in improved campgrounds. No smoking is permitted, except inside vehicles or trailers. All types of fireworks are banned.

� Holders of valid fishing licenses qualify for entrance fee discounts at state parks from Tuesdays through Thursdays until the end of the year.

� Now in effect is a fishing license requirement for 12 and 13 year-olds.

•Abajo Mountains. Conservation Officer Paul Washburn recommends corn-flavored cheese bait at Blanding number three. PowerBait and worms or artificial flies are all effective at Monticello, Foy and Blanding number four. Flies and spinners work well at Lloyd's in the early morning. Recapture Reservoir continues to produce slow fishing.

•Benches Reservoir. Last weekend, creel survey technicians reported good fishing. Bait fishermen reported success with a lemon twist or rainbow PowerBait/worm combination. A double renegade behind a bubble works well in the evening.

Todd Munford of King's Outdoor World reported good fishing in the evening with spring green PowerBait, fished behind a full bubble and three feet of leader. Todd recommends that fly fishermen use sinking line with a fast strip. The best fly is a Canadian brown leech.

•Boulgers Reservoir. Dedicated Hunter Kevin Jensen reported good fishing for eight to 13 inch trout, using green PowerBait or yellow Power Nuggets with worms. Spincasters had good luck with yellow Panther Martins with red dots.

Munford indicates that fishing is only fair. Bait fishermen are doing best with a three and a half foot leader fished behind a full bubble. He says a nightcrawler is the best bait. He suggests fishing along the southwest side of the reservoir or along the dam since the water is deeper in these areas, which helps reduce snagging on weed beds. Fly fishing is best from a float tube or pontoon boat. Use sinking line with an olive crystal bugger.

•Cleveland Reservoir. Fishing has been fair. For fast fishing, throw Jake's Spin-a-Lures in the early morning. Worms with green PowerBait or worms with a marshmallow can also be effective. Many trout are fat 17-inchers.

•Duck Fork Reservoir. Dedicated Hunter Aaron Elswood described success as good over the weekend. Anglers were catching about seven fish per hour. The best technique for bank anglers was trailing a double renegade behind a bubble with a slow retrieve. Tubers did well trolling beaded hares ears, prince nymphs, pistol Petes, or damsel fly nymph patterns. Most tigers average 17-18 inches.

Munford recommends brown leech patterns or red crystal buggers from a pontoon boat. Special regulations apply. Cutthroat trout must be immediately released to the water. Artificial flies and lures only.

•Electric Lake. Dedicated Hunter Kevin Jensen reported slow fishing for boaters and bank anglers. Fishing in the tributaries can be good, however. Two weeks ago, Dave Williams reported good fishing in the tribs with grasshopper or parachute Adams patterns.

•Fairview Lakes. Munford of King's Outdoor World says that fishing is picking up for fat 12-14 inch rainbow trout. Best fishing is on the northwest side of the lake in the early morning or late evening. Fly fishermen should troll from tubes or toons with sinking line and red or chartreuse crystal buggers. Spincasters should use a gold Jake's Spin-a-Lure. Baitcasters should slowly drift a nightcrawler just outside weed beds. The best shoreline angling is with rainbow PowerBait or Zeke's Sierra Gold, fished three and a half feet behind a full bubble. Motorboats are not allowed on the lake.

•Ferron Reservoir. Elswood checked anglers last weekend and reported poor fishing. The best tackle was a live grasshopper or hopper pattern. A week ago, lemon twist PowerBait and a worm worked well. Fly fishermen had some luck with a double renegade or damsel fly nymph. Spincasters should bring an assortment of Jake's Spin-a-Lures in their tackle box. At Ferron Reservoir, anglers may take an extra four fish, if at least four of them are brook trout.

•Huntington Creek. Fishing continues to be good. Fly fishermen have done best in runs with parachute hoppers or Chernobyl ants in sizes 12-14. Size 16-18 prince nymphs and hares ears have also been good. Baitcasters haven't done very well. Fly-fishing produces the best catch rate. Most of the trout are browns and typically range from 11-13 inches.

•Mammoth Reservoir. The reservoir produced only poor fishing last weekend. Popular baits included green PowerBait and worms. Fly patterns included leeches and wooly buggers. Tiger trout get up to 16-inches. Beginning this summer, motorboats with more than 10 horsepower are prohibited. All cutthroat trout must be immediately released.

•Scofield Reservoir. State Park Manager Dan Richards indicates that park boat ramps may become usable in late summer or early fall. The Bureau of Reclamation intends to draw the reservoir down about five feet below the normal level for dam improvements, which are scheduled to begin this fall.

Dedicated Hunter Kevin Jensen reported poor fishing last weekend. Jensen interviewed one angler, who caught four fish in four hours, using a worm and marshmallow. No one else matched that catch rate.

Williams suggests mornings and evenings for best fishing. He recommends using worms with lemon-twist PowerBait or a worm and marshmallow for baitcasters. Fly fishermen should try a damsel fly nymph or a parachute midge in size 18. Trollers should use pop gear with a worm or Triple Teaser.

Munford describes fishing as fair with the best fishing in the early morning or late evening. Fishing from a boat, tube or pontoon is best, as the lake has developed a lot of weed beds along the shoreline. Trolling has been fair with two to three colors of leaded line, dragging orange Triple Teasers or frog-imitating flat fish. Some anglers have good luck drifting a nightcrawler on monofilament. Fly fishermen who cruise the edges of weed beds have been taking some nice rainbows and cutts on the west side, using brown or olive leech patterns. Shoreline fishing is best along the rocks on the east side or in the dam cove. In these areas, dead redside shiners or orange PowerBait have been good choices.


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July 31, 2007
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